Ethan Steinquest/Macon County Times Tiny Terror Productions director and cofounder Peter Zavadil (behind camera equipment, pointing) offers feedback to crew members between takes on the square in Lafayette. Zavadil has worked on videos for artists such as Florida Georgia Line, The Black Keys and Hank Williams Jr.

Ethan Steinquest/Macon County Times

Tiny Terror Productions director and cofounder Peter Zavadil (behind camera equipment, pointing) offers feedback to crew members between takes on the square in Lafayette. Zavadil has worked on videos for artists such as Florida Georgia Line, The Black Keys and Hank Williams Jr.

From foiling a bank robbery to engaging in a high-speed chase, four officers of the Lafayette Police Department spent an action-packed Oct. 30 filming for an upcoming music video produced for Nashville recording artist Blanco, best known for featuring on Pitbull's 2018 single "Goalie Goalie."

Although the production crew did not name Blanco during interviews, the Macon County Times was able to identify the artist after he appeared on the public square to film scenes. The video is estimated to release by January of 2019.

"I didn't know until the day of that I was actually going to end up being in (the video)," Lafayette police officer Jason Sells said. "It was very interesting. Obviously, we all wanted to do a good job and represent law enforcement, along with Lafayette Police Department, Lafayette and Macon County in a very good way. Personally, I just hope it looked professional."

Sells said the shoot was his first time acting in a production, and he and the other officers added elements of their professional training as they headed off an attempted robbery at Macon Bank & Trust.

"We tried to incorporate as much of what we've been trained to do, but on the same token … I'm curious to see what it looks like after the fact," Sells said. "Certain aspects of (the video) would be spot-on, but others we never would have done that way."

Lt. Jason Roberts took the lead in a car chase scene that led the officers from the square down Hwy. 52, and a member of the crew even shot footage from inside his vehicle. Visitors to the square at near noon were able to hear the squealing of tires as the vehicles tore down a closed roadway.

"I think it was a surprise to everybody whenever the Firebird took off the way that it did," Sells said. "They filmed a short scene that was supposed to be a pursuit scene. I don't think we ever got above 40-45 mph on Hwy. 52. They had a Ford pickup truck with what I would consider a camera on a boom system that would go up or down, side to side. The Firebird was behind it."

Lafayette Fire Chief Troy Brawner also got involved in the shoot, lending the film crew his property as a set and helping out with a scene that may otherwise have been dangerous.

"(The production company) needed a small field, and we're here to help with safely burning a vehicle," Brawner said. "I'm offering it up to help Macon County and Lafayette. There's a lot of people here for filming, and they'll be eating at our restaurants or getting gas while they're in town."

Local farmer Kenny Evetts also contributed by allowing his horse, Rascal, to be featured in the video. Rascal could be seen giving rides to children and video extras throughout the afternoon before it was time to film.

"My son-in-law works with the city and wanted to know if I'd bring a horse out here," Evetts said before jokingly questioning the artist's ability to ride. "If the guy's still on (the horse when they finish), I'll say the video's good, but if he falls off ... I don't know."

Tiny Terror Productions, the company responsible for creating the video, has previously worked in Lafayette to film works for Florida Georgia Line and Sam Hunt. Executive producer and co-founder Jennifer Ansell said that working in the city has been a positive experience each time thanks to cooperation from local officials.

"It's been really film friendly every time (we've shot in Lafayette), and there's always a challenge when you have a bank robbery scene or something," Ansell said. "The city has always made filming pleasant and easy."

Sells said that the experience was a memorable one that left him impressed by the scope of the production.

"I've been around some TV shows that have been filmed," Sells said. "It's interesting to see what goes on behind the scenes with TV or music videos. I was blown away by how much production staff it takes to make something … and also the technology and equipment they had with them. I thought every aspect of it was interesting for its own particular thing, whether we were part of it, just standing there or keeping traffic off of everything."