Craig Harris/Macon County Times Pictured at last Thursday morning’s ceremony to name a portion of Highway 10 the Glen H. Donoho Highway are: (from left) Tennessee Commission of Safety and Homeland Security David Purkey, Macon County Mayor Steve Jones, former state senator Mae Beavers, Tennessee Department of Transportation Deputy Commissioner and Chief Engineer Paul Degges, Jennifer Donoho, Glen Donoho, Polly Donoho, Vic Donoho, Tennessee State Representative Kelly Keisling and District 17 Senator Mark Pody.

Craig Harris/Macon County Times

Pictured at last Thursday morning’s ceremony to name a portion of Highway 10 the Glen H. Donoho Highway are: (from left) Tennessee Commission of Safety and Homeland Security David Purkey, Macon County Mayor Steve Jones, former state senator Mae Beavers, Tennessee Department of Transportation Deputy Commissioner and Chief Engineer Paul Degges, Jennifer Donoho, Glen Donoho, Polly Donoho, Vic Donoho, Tennessee State Representative Kelly Keisling and District 17 Senator Mark Pody.

Glen Harold Donoho's family hasn't been forthright recently.

However, the former Macon County Mayor was resourceful enough to find out what he needed to know.

"They kept it a secret from me for about a month," Donoho said.

Everybody found out last Thursday morning as a ceremony was held at the Macon County Emergency Management Services building located on East Locust Street in Lafayette to rename a portion of Tennessee State Route 10 after Donoho.

"I was dumbfounded," Donoho said. "It makes you feel positive about my four-year term as county mayor.

"People in Macon County have been so good to me."

The $23-million project -- which will extend from the Highway 10/Highway 52 intersection in Lafayette to the intersection of Highway 10/Highway 25 intersection in Hartsville -- began in 2003, and the first phase of the project was completed in 2017.

"The vision of Mayor Donoho to bring this project has been met," Tennessee Department of Transportation Deputy Commissioner and Chief Engineer Paul Degges said.

The 1.5-mile, uphill stretch that has been completed consisted of widening the roadway and adding a turning lane.

"They call it the hill, but it will soon be known as the Glen H. Donoho Highway," Donoho told those in attendance. "It's not the name I fought so hard for. It's the safety of those who travel the two-mile highway.

"It takes somebody to start a ball (rolling). It takes somebody else to keep it going."

In Donoho's five-decade career, he worked with physically and mentally challenged adults as a part of the Tennessee Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, was a 23-year basketball official with the Tennessee Secondary Schools Athletic Association, was the Macon County Circuit Court Clerk for 16 years (from 1982-1998) and served as the Macon County Mayor from 2002-06.

He also served on the Peace Officers Standard Training Commission for 16 years and contributed significantly to the planning and funding of the Macon County Welcome Center.

Tennessee State Representative Kelly Keisling presented Donoho with a flag, a Tennessee General Assembly license plate, a Tennessee Blue Book and a proclamation issued by Speaker of the Tennessee House of Representatives Beth Harwell.

"This is a great honor for me," Donoho said. "I want y'all to know that I love each and every one of you."