Ethan Steinquest/Macon County Times Bill Green (center) receives a standing ovation from attendees at the 2019 Macon County Good Scout Award Breakfast, held April 11 at the Macon County Fairgrounds.

Ethan Steinquest/Macon County Times

Bill Green (center) receives a standing ovation from attendees at the 2019 Macon County Good Scout Award Breakfast, held April 11 at the Macon County Fairgrounds.

Many aspects of Macon County's modern identity can be traced back to William "Bill" Green, the county's 2019 recipient of the Good Scout Award.

Over a career spanning nearly 60 years, Green served as president of Macon Bank & Trust, helped found and lead North Central Telephone Cooperative (NCTC) and the Palace, wrote the original charter for the incorporation of Red Boiling Springs and more.

"Bill has remained an outstanding citizen and continued to exemplify the Scout Oath and Scout Law throughout his life," Macon County Friends of Scouting Chairman Pete Williston said. "(His) futuristic vision for the growth of our rural area coupled with his financial and leadership abilities have been driving forces behind his success … and contributions to our community."

Green, a native of Clay County, continues to serve on Macon Bank & Trust's board of directors and will celebrate his 70th wedding anniversary with his wife Joyce in November.

"This is an honor, and I appreciate it," Green said during his acceptance speech. "I want to thank Mr. Williston and the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) for everything they've done (for this community)."

The Good Scout Award is the highest honor presented by the Middle Tennessee Council of the Boy Scouts of America and is meant to recognize public service in the state's communities.

"He's been really thrilled the Boy Scouts have honored him," Green's daughter Patricia Ferguson said. "It surprised him, and he's particularly happy that an organization like the Boy Scouts of America thought that highly of him."

In addition to the award ceremony, attendees heard from local Eagle Scout William Harp about his experiences with the organization.

"In Boy Scouts, I met some of my biggest friends, biggest helps and best mentors … (who) helped shape me into who I am today," Harp said. "If not for scouting, I would never have learned some of the social and leadership skills necessary in life, or met some of my best friends. That's what scouting means to me."

Harp entered the scouting program at age 4 and was inspired to become an Eagle Scout on his first day after meeting an older student, Joseph Porter, with the designation.

Eagle Scout is the highest rank attainable through BSA, just as the Good Scout Award is the highest honor at the state level for those who have finished the program.

"(Good Scout Award recipients') personal and public contributions enhance our community and the world in which we live," Williston said. "It celebrates those who truly make a difference, not only because they care but because they act."