Kayla Fleming/For the Times Lafayette City Council members (from left) Seth Blankenship, Jerry Wilmore, Roger Russell and Jason Phelps were a part of the discussion before a proposal to change the door-to-door distance requirement for beer sales failed to pass.

Kayla Fleming/For the Times

Lafayette City Council members (from left) Seth Blankenship, Jerry Wilmore, Roger Russell and Jason Phelps were a part of the discussion before a proposal to change the door-to-door distance requirement for beer sales failed to pass.

The door-to-door distance requirement proposal from the Lafayette Beer Board did not pass after its second reading in front of the Lafayette City Council on Feb. 5.

Since August, the council and beer board have been discussing three separate proposals.

In November, the beer board agreed to change "distance requirements for selling beer from 500 feet to 300 feet for places of public gathering," which the board described as "hospitals, nursing homes, parks, and daycares, for the purpose of this resolution."

The proposal passed its first reading in January with a vote of 4-2, with council members Roger Russell and Pam Cothron voting no.

On Tuesday, council member Jerry Wilmore motioned to delay the vote until all council members were present as council member Steve Turner was not at the meeting. The vote failed with only three voting yes, and two voting now. There must be four votes in favor for a motion to pass.

Russell made the motion to adopt the distance change proposal but emphasized that he did so in order to speak against the motion.

"In the last thirty days, since the last council meeting, I've had an average of one person per day, and sometimes two, (reach out)," Russell said. "That would be 30-40 people, and only one of them asked me to vote for it. Everybody else asked me to vote against it."

The proposal ultimately failed with a vote of 3-2, with Willmore, with council members Seth Blankenship and Jason Phelps voting in favor and Russell and Cothron voting against. The proposal failed because it lacked the necessary four votes.

"This has been an experience for all of us," Lafayette Mayor Richard Driver said. "We have met and discussed this issue. We didn't decide on this overnight. We discussed it. We listened to those in favor of this and those opposed to this. We have been criticized … we have been joked about … we have been threatened … and we have been preached to about this."

Driver, Russell and Blankenship all said they had no comments about the "threats." Cothron and Wilmore said that they had not received any threats.

Phelps could not be reached for comment.

Driver called on those at the meeting, especially those who opposed the beer for religious reasons, to put forth effort to combat the "drug problems within our community," as he termed it.

"As a church, let your congregation know the problem with drugs and help us fight this problem," Driver said. "We can't do it alone."

In addition to the distance, the council also voted to annex property around the First Assembly Church of God on Akersville Road in Lafayette and five properties on Bradley Hollow Road that surround the city's water treatment plant.

Driver also updated some council on current projects that the city is currently working on. Driver told the council that the grant that the city has received would extend sidewalks down Highway 52 to the Highway 10 intersection.

"We tried to get sidewalks on the Scottsville Road," Driver said. "We tried and tried, but we found out from the state that there were some right-of-way issues there. Because of that, they will not fund that."

He also emphasized that the grant will not pay for sidewalks to be installed on city streets, only state highways.

He also discussed the installation of a traffic light at the Highway 52 and Ellington Drive intersection.

"The state has been working on this for a few years, and I have been told that the contract will go out this year to install that traffic light," Driver said.